Volkswagen

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After a diesel emissions scandal that cost Volkswagen billions in fines and slumping sales of its Chattanooga-made Passat sedan, Tennessee lawmakers (who have granted the automaker hundreds of millions of dollars in incentives to build and expand Chattanooga's VW plant) worried about the future of their investment, because Volkswagen was looking to cut back on certain operations.

Now things are looking up. Volkswagen's new Chattanooga-made, seven-passenger Atlas SUV is selling so well that the company plans to start building a new five-seater model, which means VW will put $340 million toward expanding the plant.

"What they're doing as far as ramping up their operations, we anticipate there'll be additional jobs," said Hamilton County Mayor Jim Coppinger, although the company isn't yet saying how many--if any--new jobs will be created.

Volkswagen North America CEO Hinrich Woebcken says, for him, the success of the Atlas symbolizes a "turnaround for our brand here in the United States."

© Copyright Volkswagen of America, Inc.

  

  The National Labor Relations Board is ordering Volkswagen to recognize a labor union at its Chattanooga, Tennessee assembly plant. But Volkswagen opposes United Auto Workers Local 42 because the group is only a small part of the plant's overall workforce.

Christian Koch, President & CEO, Volkswagen Chattanooga, discussed the 2016 Chattanooga-made Passat in a Facebook Q&A.

Volkswagen's emissions cheating scandal was the result of a "chain of errors," Chairman Hans Dieter Pötsch said Thursday, admitting that the fault extends to the company as a whole, rather than a handful of rogue engineers.

© Copyright Volkswagen of America, Inc.

  Maintenance employees at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen assembly plant will vote Thursday and Friday on whether to allow the United Auto Workers to represent them.  However, Volkswagen objects to the election because the maintenance employees comprise only a small part of the plant’s hourly workforce.

In this interview, Glenn Spencer joins us to discuss whether a European-style labor organization called a works council could be established at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen plant.  Spencer is the Vice President of the Workforce Freedom Initiative, a division of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce.  The group has prepared a new 25-page report, A New Organizing Paradigm?

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The National Labor Relations Board has ruled in favor of the United Auto Workers’ bid for a second election at Chattanooga’s Volkswagen assembly plant.

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  The United Auto Workers are seeking a an election to represent maintenance workers at Chattanooga's Volkswagen assembly plant.

Copyright Volkswagen of America, Inc..

  Last year, when workers at the Chattanooga Volkswagen plant voted on whether to allow the United Auto Workers to represent them, Volkswagen was accused of being too friendly with the UAW.  The UAW lost, and a new election could happen this year.  But this time, VW opposes it.  In this segment, we find out why, and speak with UAW Local 42 President Mike Cantrell about what's at stake in the election and whether it has anything to do with the recent VW diesel-emissions cheating scandal.

While Congress was concerned about pollution and deception in the automaker's emission problems, the state that's home to VW's only U.S. plant wants some assurances that their investment is safe.

Copyright Volkswagen of America, Inc.

  Ahead of a hearing Thursday afternoon where Tennessee state legislators will ask VW leaders about the diesel emissions scandal's potential effects on the Chattanooga plant, VW released the following statement:

The Volkswagen Group has reaffirmed its commitment to expanding its Chattanooga facility, where it plans on producing a newly developed midsize SUV for the U.S. market.

Copyright Volkswagen of America

Volkswagen unveiled the redesigned 2016 Passat in September, and a VW spokesperson confirmed the 2016 models are already in production at the Chattanooga plant.  

However, the company has no plans to actually sell the 2016 TDI diesel Passat (or other 2016 diesel Volkswagen vehicles) anytime soon, according to remarks Michael Horn, the President and CEO of Volkswagen Group of America, delivered during a Congressional hearing.

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