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Hungary Steps Up Arrest And Deportation Of Migrants

10 hours ago

On a road weaving through a forest on Hungary's southern border with Serbia, police lie in wait.

Migrants who manage to squeeze through holes cut in a barbed-wire border fence and walk north eventually have to cross Route 55 — where Hungarian police are ready for them.

Backed by agents from Frontex, the European Union's border control agency, the cops stop dozens of migrants and refugees as they emerge from the forest. They point guns and shine bright lights into the faces of frightened Iraqis and Syrians.

On Sunday night, the New York Giants celebrated a thrilling 30-27 win over the San Francisco 49ers.

But one player wasn't there to join in the jubilation.

Big food companies are buying up small ones. Honest Tea is now part of Coca-Cola. The French company Danone controls Stonyfield yogurt. Hormel owns Applegate natural and organic meats.

A debate over academic freedom of speech was ignited in summer 2014 when the University of Illinois rescinded a job offer to a professor over a controversial set of tweets about the Israel-Gaza conflict. NPR's Kelly McEvers talks with the professor, Steven Salaita, about his experience.

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Schools tend to be the center of the community in small towns across America. That's probably never been more the case for Middletown, Calif., than right now.

Last month, when a wildfire destroyed more than half of the town in the mountains north of San Francisco, the schools were miraculously spared. They've since reopened and are offering a respite from the sad, day-to-day struggles many students and staff are facing.

Cybercrime is costing the global economy nearly half a trillion dollars a year, according to the insurer Allianz. It's a major threat to businesses, which are looking for ways to protect themselves. One option is cybercrime insurance.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit

In 1938, Ernest Hemingway made a recording to promote the publication of The Fifth Column, his play about the Spanish Civil War written while he was covering the conflict for American newspapers in 1937.

"While I was writing the play, the Hotel Florida, where we lived and worked, was struck by more than 30 high-explosive shells," he said. "So if it is not a good play, perhaps that is what is the matter with it. If it is a good play, perhaps those 30 some shells helped write it."

Classes resumed at Umpqua Community College this morning, and as students made their way to school buildings, they were greeted by Gov. Kate Brown and hundreds of well-wishers. Classes at the Roseburg, Ore., campus had been suspended since the Oct. 1 shooting that left nine victims dead.

The attack came on the first week of classes at Umpqua; this past weekend, families and loved ones held memorial services and funerals for many of the victims of the shooting.

From Jefferson Public Radio, Liam Moriarty reports for our Newscast unit:

Updated 12:59 a.m. ET

The New York Mets rout the Los Angeles Dodgers 13-7, and now lead the series 2-1.

Updated 7:22 p.m. ET

From suspended, to eligible, to benched, Los Angeles Dodgers second baseman Chase Utley is not in the starting lineup for tonight's game against the New York Mets.

The political network led by billionaires David and Charles Koch is building what's meant to be a seamless system of grassroots groups, designed to advance the network's conservative and libertarian goals year in and year out, while also helping like-minded politicians.

This strategy could have come straight out of a labor union's handbook, or an Obama campaign memo: community organizing.

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Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit