Brian Naylor

NPR News' Brian Naylor is a correspondent on the Washington Desk.

In this role, he covers politics and federal agencies, including transportation and homeland security.

With more than 30 years of experience at NPR, Naylor has served as National Desk correspondent, White House correspondent, congressional correspondent, foreign correspondent and newscaster during All Things Considered. He has filled in as host on many NPR programs, including Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

During his NPR career, Naylor has covered many of the major world events, including political conventions, the Olympics, the White House, Congress and the mid-Atlantic region. Naylor reported from Tokyo in the aftermath of the 2011 earthquake and tsunami, from New Orleans following the BP oil spill, and from West Virginia after the deadly explosion at the Upper Big Branch coal mine.

While covering the U.S. Congress in the mid-1990s, Naylor's reporting contributed to NPR's 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award for political reporting.

Before coming to NPR in 1982, Naylor worked at NPR Member Station WOSU in Columbus, Ohio, and at a commercial radio station in Maine.

He earned a Bachelor of Arts degree from the University of Maine.

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5:41am

Sun May 19, 2013
Politics

Nonconservative Groups Say IRS Scrutinized Them, Too

Originally published on Sun May 19, 2013 6:46 pm

Outgoing acting Internal Revenue Service Commissioner Steve Miller (right) and Treasury Inspector General for Tax Administration J. Russell George are sworn before a full House Ways and Means Committee hearing Friday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

The IRS was in the hot seat Friday, with its outgoing acting commissioner testifying before a House committee. A Senate panel is scheduled for Tuesday. Congress is prodding to find out why the agency singled out conservative groups for special scrutiny.

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5:32pm

Wed May 15, 2013
Politics

One Reason To Apply For Tax-Exempt Status: Anonymity

Originally published on Wed May 15, 2013 9:07 pm

The exterior of the Internal Revenue Service building in Washington.
Susan Walsh AP

Revelations that the Internal Revenue Service targeted some conservative groups seeking tax-exempt status for extra scrutiny have put a spotlight on a part of the tax code increasingly popular with political groups: section 501(c)(4).

But what's the benefit for organizations to get approved for 501(c)(4) status?

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5:07pm

Wed May 8, 2013
Politics

Push To End Teens' Distracted Driving Targets Parents, Peers

Originally published on Wed May 8, 2013 5:55 pm

A screengrab from Brittany Anne Devasure's winning Project Yellow Light video, aimed at discouraging distracted driving.
YouTube

4:29pm

Mon May 6, 2013
It's All Politics

Some Democrats Back Same-Sex Amendment To Immigration Bill

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 9:00 pm

Some Democrats want to amend the immigration bill before the Senate to allow foreign-born same-sex spouses of Americans to qualify for green cards.
Jason Reed Reuters/Landov

The immigration overhaul bill before the Senate would provide, among other things, more visas for migrant farm workers and high-tech workers, and a path to citizenship for the estimated 11 million undocumented immigrants in the United States.

One thing it would not provide is help for same-sex couples in which one partner is an American and one foreign-born. For heterosexual couples, a foreign-born spouse automatically qualifies for a green card and many of the benefits of citizenship. Not so with gay and lesbian couples.

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5:25am

Tue April 30, 2013
Politics

Advocates Honor LaHood's Time At Transportation Department

Originally published on Mon May 6, 2013 3:27 pm

As outgoing Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood prepares to hand off the baton to President Obama's nominee, Charlotte Mayor Anthony Foxx, Morning Edition reflects on Lahood's legacy. What have he and the president accomplished? What's still to be done?

5:48pm

Wed April 24, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Response Praised, But Intelligence-Sharing Questioned

Originally published on Thu April 25, 2013 4:57 pm

First responders aid injured people at the finish line of the Boston Marathon after the bombing on April 15.
Charles Krupa AP

In the days since the Boston Marathon bombings, local law enforcement officials have been given high marks for their response to the attack and the coordination among numerous federal, state and local agencies involved.

But at the same time, questions are being raised about the coordination among federal agencies handling intelligence they had about the suspects in the months before the attack.

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5:37pm

Mon April 22, 2013
Explosions At Boston Marathon

Boston Lockdown 'Extraordinary' But Prudent, Experts Say

Originally published on Mon April 22, 2013 9:52 pm

A sign on I-93 alerts motorists that Boston is under a "shelter in place" order Friday.
Elise Amendola AP

Local officials have defended the decision to essentially lock down the city of Boston on Friday while law enforcement searched for a suspect in the Boston Marathon bombing.

Residents were told to remain indoors during the hunt for Dzhokhar Tsarnaev, who survived an early morning shootout with police in the suburb of Watertown during which his brother, Tamerlan, was killed.

Massachusetts Gov. Deval Patrick announced the decision to lock down Watertown and the surrounding areas, including Boston, at a dawn news conference Friday.

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5:50pm

Wed April 10, 2013
It's All Politics

Some States Hike Gas Tax; Va. Tries New Route To Fund Roads

Originally published on Wed April 10, 2013 7:19 pm

Drivers travel on Interstate 495, the Capital Beltway, near Tysons Corner in Fairfax County, Va., in November, just days before the opening of four new express lanes. Virginia is among 19 states that have approved or are considering legislation to increase transportation funding, according to Transportation for America.
Cliff Owen AP

It's no secret that many of the nation's roads are in pretty bad shape. In the latest report card from the American Society of Civil Engineers, the condition of America's highways rated a grade of D.

Congestion is a big problem, and so is upkeep. Most states rely on gas taxes to raise the money for repairs and new construction, but that funding source is not the stream it used to be, says James Corless of Transportation for America.

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4:05pm

Fri April 5, 2013
U.S.

FBI Building May Soon Be 'Put Out Of Its Misery'

Originally published on Fri April 5, 2013 6:04 pm

The Federal Bureau of Investigation headquarters in Washington, just blocks from the White House, has long been the government building everyone loves to hate.
Manuel Balce Ceneta AP

The nation's capital has been undergoing something of a building boom. Dozens of construction cranes dot the Washington, D.C., skyline.

So it comes as no surprise that the federal government is hoping to take advantage of the real estate values and unload what's seen by many as an eyesore on Pennsylvania Avenue: the J. Edgar Hoover Building, headquarters of the FBI.

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5:47pm

Tue March 12, 2013
It's All Politics

'Unprecedented': Budget Cuts Could Hit Some Airport Towers

Originally published on Mon March 25, 2013 1:45 pm

A statue of golf legend Arnold Palmer stands outside Arnold Palmer Regional Airport in Latrobe, Pa.
Brian Naylor NPR

Control towers at many small and medium-sized airports around the country are set to shut down next month because of the across-the-board federal budget cuts. The towers have been operated under contract to the Federal Aviation Administration.

One of the airports affected is in Latrobe, Pa., southeast of Pittsburgh — the Arnold Palmer Regional Airport, named after the golf great who grew up a well-placed drive from the runway. A statue of Palmer watches over the small terminal.

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3:34am

Fri March 8, 2013
It's All Politics

Senate Mostly Blamed For Agency And Court Vacancies, But Obama Isn't Helping

Originally published on Fri March 8, 2013 11:50 am

The Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives has not had a permanent administrator since Congress required that the director be confirmed by the Senate in 2006.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

Hear Brian Nayor, Julie Rovner, Yuki Noguchi and Carrie Johnson talk with Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep about the many federal entities operating without permanent leadership by clicking the audio link.

Some workers may dream about how productive they'd be without a boss. But for thousands of federal employees, being without a boss is a reality. And productivity isn't necessarily the result.

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4:23pm

Tue March 5, 2013
The Two-Way

TSA Will Lift Ban Of Small Knives, Wiffle Ball Bats Aboard Planes

Originally published on Tue March 5, 2013 4:47 pm

A TSA illustration of knives that will be allowed on planes.
TSA

The TSA is whittling down the list of objects air travelers are forbidden to carry on board and says small pocket knives will soon be allowed on commercial flights.

But thats not all! According to the TSA, travelers will also be able to take on board golf clubs (a maximum of two), hockey sticks, and wiffle ball bats. Yes, wiffle ball bats. Finally!

TSA Administrator John Pistole outlined the changes today at an appearance in New York.

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3:02am

Thu February 21, 2013
It's All Politics

One Place You May Notice The Sequester: At The Airport

Originally published on Thu February 21, 2013 5:52 am

A passenger jet flies past the FAA control tower at Washington's Ronald Reagan National Airport in 2011.
Cliff Owen AP

Unless Congress acts, across-the-board spending cuts scheduled to take effect March 1 will be felt throughout the government. Some of the most visible effects will be noticed by air travelers.

Officials predict that cutbacks at the Federal Aviation Administration could lead to takeoff delays and fewer flights overall.

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2:59am

Tue February 19, 2013
Politics

Get A Social Security Check? Treasury Says It's Time To Go Electronic

Originally published on Tue February 19, 2013 12:33 pm

U.S. Treasury checks are run through a printer.
William Thomas Cain Getty Images

Every month, the government sends out about 5 million checks to Americans who receive federal benefits. On March 1, the Treasury Department is making those paper checks a thing of the past.

Since May 2011, all new Social Security recipients are required to get direct deposit of their benefits. Some 93 percent of all recipients now do.

But there are still holdouts, so the Treasury Department started a campaign and a website, Go Direct, in an effort to convince the remaining 7 percent.

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4:23pm

Thu February 7, 2013
It's All Politics

Rubio's Job: Play Second Fiddle To The President, And Don't Mess Up

Originally published on Thu February 7, 2013 5:28 pm

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