David Kestenbaum

David Kestenbaum is a correspondent for NPR, covering science, energy issues and, most recently, the global economy for NPR's multimedia project Planet Money. David has been a science correspondent for NPR since 1999. He came to journalism the usual way — by getting a Ph.D. in physics first.

In his years at NPR, David has covered science's discoveries and its darker side, including the Northeast blackout, the anthrax attacks and the collapse of the New Orleans levees. He has also reported on energy issues, particularly nuclear and climate change.

David has won awards from the American Association for the Advancement of Science, the American Physical Society and the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers.

David worked briefly on the show This American Life, and set up a radio journalism program in Cambodia on a Fulbright fellowship. He also teaches a journalism class at Johns Hopkins University.

David holds a bachelor's of science degree in physics from Yale University and a doctorate in physics from Harvard University.

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4:40pm

Thu March 26, 2015
Planet Money

Computer Models Play 'What If' Game With Our Economy

Originally published on Thu March 26, 2015 8:01 pm

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5:25am

Thu February 26, 2015
Business

Greek Finance Minister Gets A Chance To Fix Beleaguered Economy

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 7:52 am

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4:46pm

Fri February 20, 2015
Planet Money

Bakers And The Birth Of The Minimum Wage

Originally published on Fri February 20, 2015 10:43 pm

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On January 1, 20 states raise their minimum wage and several states have additional increases planned in the coming months. Yesterday, we learned that Walmart will raise its base pay to $9 an hour this April.

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5:43pm

Thu January 29, 2015
Planet Money

The Spicy History Of Short Selling Stocks

Originally published on Fri January 30, 2015 10:07 am

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3:58pm

Thu October 9, 2014
Planet Money

How College Students Battled Textbook Publishers To A Draw, In 3 Graphs

Originally published on Tue October 14, 2014 1:18 pm

Quoctrung Bui/NPR

College textbooks are expensive. You probably already know this. A new biology or economics book can cost $300.

And prices have been soaring, doubling over the past decade, growing faster than the price of housing, cars, even health care.

But, surprisingly, the amount students actually spend on textbooks has not been rising. In fact, the best data we could find on this shows students have been spending a bit less over time.

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3:36am

Thu August 21, 2014
Planet Money

Typewriters, Underwater Hotels And Picturephones: The Future, As Seen From 1964

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 4:56 pm

General Motors

The 1964 World's Fair showcased jet packs and new miracles of science. There was an entire house made of Formica. You could wipe it clean with a sponge!

The people who put the fair together tried to imagine how the future would look. Here are a few predictions, and how they actually turned out.

1. We had picture phones back then?

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7:14am

Fri August 1, 2014
Business

Everyone Goes To The Store To Get Milk. So Why's It Way In The Back?

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5:12am

Thu June 12, 2014
Planet Money

Volatility Index Indicates Wall Street Is Bored

Originally published on Thu June 12, 2014 9:40 am

An economic indicator commonly called the VIX, volatility index, is also known as the fear index. Whatever you call it, the index is hitting lows not seen since before the financial crisis.

6:08pm

Thu June 5, 2014
Planet Money

Why A Pack Of Peanut Butter M&M's Weighs A Tiny Bit Less Than A Regular Pack

Originally published on Wed June 25, 2014 5:03 pm

Peanut Butter M&M's are larger and more irregular than standard M&M's.
Quoctrung Bui/NPR

The other day I went down to the little shop in the lobby of our building for a snack. I couldn't decide whether I wanted regular M&M's or Peanut Butter M&M's so I bought them both. On the way back upstairs to the office, I noticed something strange on the labels. Each had cost $1, but the pack of Peanut Butter M&M's was a very tiny bit lighter: 0.06 ounces lighter!

I wanted to know why, so I called a couple of experts and asked for their theories:

Theory No. 1: Peanut Butter M&M's are more expensive to make.

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5:05am

Thu May 22, 2014
Planet Money

On The Internet, A Penny Is Nothing To Sneeze At

Originally published on Thu May 22, 2014 9:18 am

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4:44pm

Fri May 2, 2014
Economy

The History Of Light, In 6 Minutes And 47 Seconds

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 11:57 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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And now, 4,000 years of economic growth in seven minutes. This story comes, of course, from our Planet Money team. David Kestenbaum and Jacob Goldstein bring us the history of light and how the world came what it is today.

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4:59am

Fri April 4, 2014
Planet Money

New Web Addresses Provide Alternatives To Crowded Domains

Originally published on Fri April 4, 2014 8:22 am

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On a Friday it's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning. I'm Steve Inskeep.

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6:00pm

Thu March 6, 2014
Planet Money

Does Raising The Minimum Wage Kill Jobs?

Originally published on Thu March 6, 2014 7:50 pm

Kenzo Tribouillard AFP/Getty Images

President Obama has called for increasing the minimum wage, saying it will help some of the poorest Americans. Opponents argue that a higher minimum wage will lead employers to cut jobs.

Figuring out the effect of raising the minimum wage is tough. Ideally you'd like to compare one universe where the minimum was raised against an alternate universe where it remained fixed.

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3:39am

Fri January 17, 2014
Planet Money

The Birth Of The Minimum Wage In America

Originally published on Fri January 17, 2014 4:46 pm

Franklin D. Roosevelt Libarary

In 1895, legislators in New York state decided to improve working conditions in what at the time could be a deadly profession: baking bread.

"Bakeries are actually extremely dangerous places to work," says Eric Rauchway, a historian at the University of California, Davis. "Because flour is such a fine particulate, if it gets to hang in the air it can catch fire and the whole room can go up in a sheet of flame."

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12:00pm

Thu January 2, 2014
Planet Money

A Bet, Five Metals And The Future Of The Planet

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 11:24 am

James Cridland Flickr

This famous bet — between a biologist and an economist — was over population growth. It started three decades ago, but it helped set the tone for environmental debates that are still happening today.

The biologist at the heart of this bet was Paul Ehrlich at Stanford. He wrote a best-selling book in 1968 called The Population Bomb. It was so popular he appeared on The Tonight Show with Johnny Carson.

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