Liz Halloran

Liz Halloran joined NPR in December 2008 as Washington correspondent for Digital News, taking her print journalism career into the online news world.

Halloran came to NPR from US News & World Report, where she followed politics and the 2008 presidential election. Before the political follies, Halloran covered the Supreme Court during its historic transition — from Chief Justice William Rehnquist's death, to the John Roberts and Samuel Alito confirmation battles. She also tracked the media and wrote special reports on topics ranging from the death penalty and illegal immigration, to abortion rights and the aftermath of the Amish schoolgirl murders.

Before joining the magazine, Halloran was a senior reporter in the Hartford Courant's Washington bureau. She followed Sen. Joe Lieberman on his ground-breaking vice presidential run in 2000, as the first Jewish American on a national ticket, wrote about the media and the environment and covered post-9/11 Washington. Previously, Halloran, a Minnesota native, worked for The Courant in Hartford. There, she was a member of Pulitzer Prize-winning team for spot news in 1999, and was honored by the New England Associated Press for her stories on the Kosovo refugee crisis.

She also worked for the Republican-American newspaper in Waterbury, Conn., and as a cub reporter and paper delivery girl for her hometown weekly, the Jackson County Pilot.

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1:24pm

Wed July 11, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Absorbs Boos, Tells NAACP That Democrats Have Failed Blacks

Originally published on Wed July 11, 2012 3:02 pm

Mitt Romney speaks at the NAACP annual convention Wednesday in Houston.
Pat Sullivan AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney didn't expect a warm embrace when he took the stage Wednesday at the NAACP annual convention in Houston.

And he didn't get one.

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5:30pm

Tue July 10, 2012
It's All Politics

Intriguing Opportunity, But Some Risk For Romney In Speech To NAACP

A sign at the NAACP annual convention in Houston, where Mitt Romney is scheduled to speak on Wednesday.
Pat Sullivan AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's planned speech Wednesday at the NAACP convention in Houston comes at a precarious time for the nation's African-American community.

-- The unemployment rate among blacks is north of 14 percent — more than 5 points higher than the national average.

-- Opponents of GOP-led efforts to require voters in about a dozen states to show identification say the voter ID laws could disproportionately disenfranchise legal black and Latino voters.

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5:38pm

Fri June 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Opponents Of Secondary Provisions In Health Care Law Look To Lower Courts

Originally published on Sat June 30, 2012 1:45 pm

A demonstrator protests outside the the Supreme Court Thursday in Washington, D.C.
David Goldman AP

When the Supreme Court upheld the central tenet of President Obama's health care law, it meant that several lower court fights on other aspects of the sweeping legislation can move forward.

Those cases, including high-profile lawsuits by Catholic organizations challenging the law's contraception coverage rules, would, obviously, have been affected if the court had found the individual mandate unconstitutional or struck down the law in its entirety.

But with the law intact, the lawsuits — many of them held in abeyance pending the high court's decision — will proceed.

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1:16pm

Thu June 28, 2012
It's All Politics

Legal Scholars React: 'Many People Were Stunned'

Originally published on Thu June 28, 2012 6:08 pm

Courtesy Columbia

In the most anticipated and politicized Supreme Court ruling since Bush v. Gore, which decided the 2000 U.S. presidential contest, the high court on Thursday let stand, in a 5-4 decision, the centerpiece of President Obama's health care legislation.

Chief Justice John Roberts, providing the deciding vote and writing the majority opinion, laid out the rationale, which says that Congress under the Commerce Clause does not have the authority to require people to buy insurance — but it does have the authority to tax people who do not have coverage.

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11:09am

Fri June 22, 2012
It's All Politics

Bloomberg Pollster Defends Survey Showing Obama With Big Lead

Originally published on Fri June 22, 2012 12:46 pm

Bloomberg pollster J. Ann Selzer ignited something of a political firestorm this week when her national survey for the news organization showed President Obama leading GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney among likely voters by 13 points, 53-40 percent.

Most recent polls have shown the race much closer.

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3:22pm

Thu June 21, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney Softens Rhetoric, If Not Policies, In Speech To Latino Leaders

Originally published on Fri June 29, 2012 3:56 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney gives a young supporter a boost at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials conference in Orlando, Fla., on Thursday.
Charles Dharapak AP

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney softened his tough primary-campaign tone on immigration, if not his positions, during a speech Thursday to national Hispanic leaders.

In comments to thousands gathered at the National Association of Latino Elected and Appointed Officials in Orlando, Fla., the former Massachusetts governor criticized President Obama's failure to take action on comprehensive immigration reform.

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1:16pm

Wed June 20, 2012
It's All Politics

In Vice Presidential Buzz, Pawlenty Is Up While Rubio's Status Is Muddled

Originally published on Thu July 19, 2012 5:07 pm

Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney stands with former Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty during a campaign stop Saturday in Cornwall, Pa.
Evan Vucci AP

Back in April when NPR looked at Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney's potential running-mate picks, Florida Sen. Marco Rubio and GOP Govs. Mitch Daniels of Indiana and Bob McDonnell of Virginia were on our short list.

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5:01pm

Wed June 13, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney, Obama: When Wooing Female Voters, Check Marital Status First

Originally published on Thu June 14, 2012 10:20 am

A voter casts her ballot in Stow, Ohio, during the March 6 primary.
David Maxwell EPA/Landov

What do women want, electorally speaking?

We know that women, like men, are "not some monolithic bloc," to quote the current occupant of the White House.

But as a group they are reliably influential voters, more risk-averse than men, and — pollsters tell us — generally more likely than the opposite sex to vote for Democrats, oppose the use of military force and support government programs.

In 2008, unmarried women, one of the nation's fastest-growing demographic groups, were a key to Barack Obama's presidential win.

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6:44pm

Wed June 6, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Ground in Wisconsin: Lessons From The Losing Side

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 10:45 am

A sign along a county highway in Saukville, Wis. Exit polls showed 38 percent of voters with a labor union member in the family voted for Republican Gov. Scott Walker.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

The morning after Republican Gov. Scott Walker of Wisconsin handily rebuffed Democratic efforts to oust him, politicos in the state and beyond pored over exit poll data and turnout numbers to tease out:

A: How he did it.

B: Where Democrats failed.

My colleague Ron Elving, NPR's senior Washington editor, took a good shot at answering Question A Wednesday morning.

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6:44pm

Wed June 6, 2012
It's All Politics

On The Ground In Wisconsin: Lessons From The Winning Side

Originally published on Thu June 7, 2012 10:45 am

Don Taylor, GOP chairman in Wisconsin's Republican-dominated Waukesha County.
Liz Halloran NPR

Don Taylor, one of Wisconsin's most influential Republicans, had predicted that GOP Gov. Scott Walker would stave off recall challenger Tom Barrett, a Democrat, by a couple of percentage points.

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1:30pm

Tue June 5, 2012
It's All Politics

Wisconsin Moderates: Heroes Or Heretics?

Originally published on Tue June 5, 2012 4:04 pm

Stickers are given to voters Tuesday in Milwaukee. Wisconsin voters are choosing between Republican Gov. Scott Walker and Democratic challenger Tom Barrett in a recall election.
Jeffrey Phelps AP

When Wisconsin State Sen. Dale Schultz goes to the polls Tuesday, he will vote for GOP Gov. Scott Walker in the gubernatorial recall election.

"I'm a Republican," Schultz said during an interview in his Capitol office in Madison, on the eve of the state's historically acrimonious and expensive recall election.

But if the Democratic candidate, Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, succeeds in ousting Walker, Schultz, 58, says, "I'm going to do everything I can to make him successful, too."

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4:31pm

Thu May 31, 2012
It's All Politics

Romney's Week: Upstaged Time And Again

Former President George W. Bush winks in the East Room of the White House on Thursday during a ceremony to unveil his portrait.
Carolyn Kaster AP

What a week it was to have been for Mitt Romney.

But what a week it wasn't.

Poised to triumphantly clinch the Republican nomination for president, Romney instead was upstaged Tuesday by supporter Donald Trump's new birther-on-steroids shtick that stole the headlines and the candidate's big moment.

Then on Thursday, ready to embarrass President Obama by holding a "surprise" press event in front of Solyndra, the Obama-touted California solar energy company that failed after getting a $535 million government loan guarantee, Romney was upstaged yet again.

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4:44pm

Wed May 30, 2012
It's All Politics

New Wisconsin Poll: Walker Maintains Lead; Obama Gains Strength

A new survey of Wisconsin voters shows GOP Gov. Scott Walker maintaining his lead over Milwaukee Mayor Tom Barrett, the Democrat who is trying to oust the governor in a recall election Tuesday.

And the survey had good news for President Obama: during the last half of the month, he improved his standing against GOP presidential candidate Mitt Romney in Wisconsin.

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1:18pm

Wed May 30, 2012
It's All Politics

GOP Chairman Says Recall Outcome Could Help Turn Wisconsin Red In November

Originally published on Wed May 30, 2012 2:45 pm

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus says the national party is putting its full weight behind Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker in Tuesday's recall election.
Danny Johnston AP

Republican National Committee Chairman Reince Priebus said Wednesday he is "very confident" that Wisconsin GOP Gov. Scott Walker will survive next week's recall election.

And Priebus, a Wisconsin native, said that a Walker win Tuesday over Democratic challenger Tom Barrett would mean "a much tougher road in Wisconsin" for President Obama in November's general election.

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5:01pm

Tue May 29, 2012
It's All Politics

Maine Independent Aims To Be Senate King, Acknowledges Potted Plant Potential

Originally published on Tue May 29, 2012 5:57 pm

Former Maine Gov. Angus King speaks March 5 at Bowdoin College in Brunswick, Maine.
Joel Page AP

The most potentially influential politician you've probably never heard of, former two-term Maine Gov. Angus King, on Tuesday officially entered the race to replace retiring moderate GOP Sen. Olympia Snowe.

King, 68, an alternative-energy entrepreneur and supporter of President Obama, filed more than 6,000 signatures with Maine's secretary of state to ensure his place on November's ballot.

He'll run as an independent, as he did for his successful gubernatorial runs in the 1990s.

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