Michael Edward Miller

News Director

A graduate of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Michael Edward Miller is WUTC's News Director and the Executive Producer of Around and About Chattanooga. His favorite radio programs and podcasts include This American Life, Radiolab and Everything Is Stories. During WUTC fund drives, he looks forward to cats clawing out another Pet Wars Day victory.

Ways to Connect

Chattanooga’s new city budget includes a record-setting $5 million to improve roads, pay raises for police officers, and a property tax freeze for senior citizens. During a roll call vote Tuesday evening, every City Council representative voted for it—except one.

Councilman Chip Henderson, chair of the Budget & Finance Committee, said people in his district (District 1, which includes Hixson, Mountain Creek and Lookout Valley) were concerned the 2018 city budget would raise their property tax bills.

City of Chattanooga

The new Chattanooga Police Chief says it was a humbling experience, being sworn in while a packed auditorium at the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga watched. He felt honored. But it's only the beginning.

"For me, this just lights the fuse," Chief David Roddy said.  "I'm excited about getting to work."

Roddy expects to continue the police department’s commitment to developing community partnerships, because "officers can’t keep the city safe working alone. We need your help. We must build trust in order to maintain public safety and effective policing."

Prairie Home Productions

Although he's retired from hosting the radio version of A Prairie Home Companion, Garrison Keillor is bringing his live (non-broadcast) Prairie Home "Love and Comedy" Tour to Chattanooga's Tivoli Theatre on Saturday, September 9, 2017. This live performance features musicians Richard Dworsky and The Road Hounds and Heather Masse, and sound-effects wizard Fred Newman.

Chattanooga mayor's office

At a press conference, acting Chattanooga Police Chief David Roddy told reporters and officials a story about why he became an officer. He said, when he was growing up, he saw other kids being picked on.

“I saw stronger, bigger kids bullying kids who weren’t able to defend themselves,” he said. “I remember seeing this where I attended at Tyner High School when I saw a kid get picked on in gym class. And I knew then that the direction of my life was to help protect those that were unable to stand up for themselves.”

WUTC

It was a bit of a bumpy road, creating the new budget for the city of Chattanooga. But one possible result: fewer bumpy roads.

“We are putting five million dollars into street paving,” Maura Sullivan, the city’s Chief Operating Officer, said as she and other officials presented the proposed budget during a City Council meeting Tuesday evening.

State lawmakers passed the IMPROVE Act, which increases Tennessee’s tax rate at the gas pump, giving the city new funds for road repairs. But the IMPROVE act also cuts the Hall income tax and the state's sales tax rate on food, which means less revenue for city expenses like pensions for employees and other benefits.

Technology can be pretty distracting at the dinner table, when people are texting instead of talking to their family members. But technology has the opposite effect at Sue's Tech Kitchen. Serving sweet treats inspired by STEM education, the place gets kids and parents interacting with each other and playing with high-tech gadgets that combine coding and dining. For example, a robot controlled by candy.

Alaska.gov

In Alaska, rides to a hospital can cost a small fortune.

“Our uniqueness comes from the fact that 82% of our communities are not connected by roads,” Alaska Governor Bill Walker told NPR in a recent interview. “So we don't take a $300 ambulance ride to the hospital. We take a $50,000 to $150,000 Medevac. Our costs of health care are certainly the highest in the nation.”

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

A Chattanooga physician says the Affordable Care Act saved her life, and she’s challenging claims that the Senate can replace Obamacare with something better.

She’s the founder of the Chattanooga Sports Institute Center for Health, and an athlete who has finished seven Ironman competitions. But a sudden diagnosis slowed her down.

"Two and a half years ago," she says, "I was diagnosed with a very devastating, incurable, chronic vascular disease. I lost, almost lost my entire right leg to that. And now I’ve won the lottery of pre-existing conditions."

“Are we really done with windows?” asks one of the characters in Courtney Maum’s new novel Touch.

He’s not talking about the operating system.

“I mean the architectural component that lets in light,” he says. “I mean, if I have a window, then—and this is really modern—I can just look through it and decide all by myself how to dress. I don’t need my home automation system to send me a text.”

CBS

Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

Ashley Evans, Executive Director of the free health clinic Volunteers In Medicine, joins us to talk about a CVS Health Foundation Grant the clinic recently received to tackle a significant local health problem: diabetes. Also, we talk about the clinic's 2nd Annual Run for Health at Camp Jordan on June 3rd.

FROM A MEDIA RELEASE:

WUTC's 2016 Operation Song Memorial Day Special won an Edward R. Murrow Award and a Golden Press Card Award. This year's rebroadcast includes a new song and story, "Change," which explains the meanings behind pennies, dimes, and other coins left on military headstones.

The song “Change” explains why people around the nation are leaving coins at the graves of soldiers, sailors, and other military service members. 

YouTube

Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

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