Michael Edward Miller

Around & About Executive Producer/News Director

A graduate of the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, Michael Edward Miller is WUTC's News Director and the Executive Producer of Around and About Chattanooga. His favorite radio programs and podcasts include This American Life, Radiolab and Everything Is Stories. During WUTC fund drives, he looks forward to cats clawing out another Pet Wars Day victory.

Ways to Connect

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A Chattanooga physician says the Affordable Care Act saved her life, and she’s challenging claims that the Senate can replace Obamacare with something better.

She’s the founder of the Chattanooga Sports Institute Center for Health, and an athlete who has finished seven Ironman competitions. But a sudden diagnosis slowed her down.

"Two and a half years ago," she says, "I was diagnosed with a very devastating, incurable, chronic vascular disease. I lost, almost lost my entire right leg to that. And now I’ve won the lottery of pre-existing conditions."

“Are we really done with windows?” asks one of the characters in Courtney Maum’s new novel Touch.

He’s not talking about the operating system.

“I mean the architectural component that lets in light,” he says. “I mean, if I have a window, then—and this is really modern—I can just look through it and decide all by myself how to dress. I don’t need my home automation system to send me a text.”

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Mimi Kennedy was destined for fame; as a child, she wanted to be an actress, and throughout her career, Broadway, the big screen and TV have served her well, making her face familiar to almost everyone. She's also an author and activist, and she's chatting with WUTC about her on- and off-stage roles in life, starting with her portrayal of Jan in both the original Broadway and National Touring productions of Grease.

Ashley Evans, Executive Director of the free health clinic Volunteers In Medicine, joins us to talk about a CVS Health Foundation Grant the clinic recently received to tackle a significant local health problem: diabetes. Also, we talk about the clinic's 2nd Annual Run for Health at Camp Jordan on June 3rd.

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WUTC's 2016 Operation Song Memorial Day Special won an Edward R. Murrow Award and a Golden Press Card Award. This year's rebroadcast includes a new song and story, "Change," which explains the meanings behind pennies, dimes, and other coins left on military headstones.

The song “Change” explains why people around the nation are leaving coins at the graves of soldiers, sailors, and other military service members. 

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Why don't people sing together anymore? During the Civil Rights movement, marchers used songs to bond with each other, but modern protest movements don't necessarily unite the same way. 

Dr. Ysaye Barnwell encourages people to put down their phones and make real-world connections through the power of group singing.

Paula Poundstone

The red Lamborghini did little to improve Paula Poundstone's mood.

She says she was "feeling like a jerk" as she drove it through Los Angeles, a self-inflicted experiment to discover the secret to happiness.

"We live in a world where there's a lot of people who don't have homes," she says. "And who wants to drive by that in a Lamborghini? You know, I don't like walking by it to get on the train. So it just it creates a much more stark reminder of the inequities, you know, the imbalance in in our world. And you know normally I just walk down the street feeling helpless to help people."

She also tried camping, taekwondo, volunteering and other activities as she searched for deep personal satisfaction. Some became habits.

Jen Lewin's please-touch-the-art approach to public sculpture inspired The Pool. The globe-trotting installation will be on display in Chattanooga April 21-30, and by "on display," I mean that you're invited to jump and dance and boogie all over it and see how it reacts.

The idea for Tennessee author/biologist David George Haskell's new book The Songs of Trees: Stories from Nature's Great Connectors came from an almost offhand remark he made while teaching at The University of the South in Sewanne. 

Welcome Home of Chattanooga provides compassionate end-of-life care to homeless people and those in need. The organization's first all-day conference is happening April 21st, and Roy Remer from San Francisco's Zen Hospice Project is the keynote speaker. Remer and Welcome Home co-founder Sherry Campbell join us to talk about demystifying death and dying.

Songbirds Guitar Museum is located in the Chattanooga Choo Choo complex, with more than 550 acoustic and electric guitars on display. If you’re a Beatles fan, you’ll see examples of the band's favorite Rickenbacker and Gretsch models. Rows of glass cases also show off rare Fender prototype Telecasters, and Martin acoustics from the 1930s and 40s.

At Chattanooga’s Walnut Street Bridge, a new memorial could ensure an old injustice is never forgotten.

The bright blue bridge is usually a place for recreation, with men and women jogging, couples holding hands, and a scenic view beyond the handrails. Tourism officials tout the landmark as the world’s longest pedestrian bridge. It may be the Chattanooga's most iconic landmark, second only to the Choo Choo.

It can also be a somber place.

 Dr. Jonathan McNair joins us to discuss "O King," a tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. that will feature music and spoken-word performances. At the event, two new instrumental works by Dr. Jonathan McNair will premiere.

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