Richard Winham

Afternoon Music Host, Around & About Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

Cheryl Jackson has been sick for most of her life. She is now in her early 40’s and it is only in the last two years that she has been able to count on relatively good health.

The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Percussion Ensemble’s annual year-end concert called Beat Hunger is set for this Sunday November 22 and Monday November 23 at 7:30 in the UTC Fine Arts Center. That it’s scheduled for two successive nights is a testament to its popularity. Richard Winham talked to Dr. Monte Coulter, the director of the percussion program here at UTC. He told him the original impetus for the increasingly popular concerts came from seeing homeless people on the streets in the neighborhood surrounding UTC.  

SoundCorps, a local non-profit whose goal is to “build Chattanooga’s music economy” is the result of two years' work, according to the executive director, Stratton Tingle. In the summer of 2014, a group of music business researchers from Austin, Texas were invited to Chattanooga to measure music’s impact on the city’s economy. Armed with the results of that study, Stratton Tingle formed a board and began raising money to establish SoundCorps as a resource for music professionals in Chattanooga.

  The exhibition now up at Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway in Chattanooga is called Trees and Skies. Among the artists whose work is included in the exhibition are Carol Hobbs and Mike Ivey. Richard Winham went over to the gallery to see their paintings and to talk to them about their work.

Like many young married couples, Santhosh and Susan Mathews were delighted when Susan became pregnant for the first time. But when they went in for a routine ultrasound they were devastated when the doctor told them their baby had serious birth defects and would probably be still born. But when one doctor after another suggested they should abort the baby, they were steadfast in their resolve to carry the baby to term.

  In a new book on Robert Frost’s poem “The Road Not Taken,” David Orr, the poetry critic for The New York Times, contends that it’s a poem “everyone loves and almost everyone gets wrong.” WUTC's Richard Winham talked to David Orr about Robert Frost and found that the poet, like his poetry, was almost often misunderstood and, equally, underestimated.  

The Ensemble Nagata Shachu, a group of five musicians from Toronto, is coming to Chattanooga to play in the Patten Performance Series on Tuesday, September 15. The music they play fuses centuries old Japanese folk music with contemporary rock, jazz and minimalism. The group’s leader and principal composer, Kyoshi Nagata, talked to Richard Winham.  

Since its inception in 2011, Jazzanooga has been promoting jazz in Chattanooga. But more than that, as the founder Shane Morrow put it, Jazzanooga celebrates all of the arts and their power to bring us together. Richard Winham talked to Shane Morrow who told him Jazzanooga is a mission.

  There are two more shows to come in this year’s Riverfront Nights Series. WUTC's Richard Winham talked to Jeff Styles about the series. Styles booked all the acts again this year, but having done that, he’s now happy to be just another listener relaxing by the river enjoying the music.  

Peter Lundberg is a renowned sculptor whose work is in cities across the country and in Canada as well as in China, Germany and Australia among other countries around the world.

Recently his friend, the sculptor John Henry, invited him to come to Chattanooga to create a monument to the four Marines and one Naval Officer killed here in July.

Local poet, playwright and social activist Peggy Douglas has written a play
centering on the impact of the sweeping social changes of the 1960’s on
three distinct communities in Chattanooga. Called “After Work,” the play
centers on the white “townies” and “mill people” and the African American
community living on and around 9th street. In a series of monologs, the
characters in the play talk about their lives and their dreams. Richard
Winham talked to the play’s director, Rebecca Rouse and one of the actors in
the play, Erin Skelley.

This year marks the ninth year of concerts in the Riverfront Nights series. As in previous years, six shows were scheduled this year. This week’s concert featuring the Whisky Gentry is the third in this year’s line-up. Richard Winham talked to Jeff Styles about the series. It was Jeff Styles’s idea to create a Nightfall —style concert series on the waterfront, but this year marks his last. He booked the bands again this year, but he’s no longer running the show.

For the next couple of months Reflections gallery on Lee Highway here in Chattanooga is celebrating The Rural South. Two of the twenty-five artists whose work is featured in the exhibition talked to WUTC's Richard Winham about their work.  One is Matt Welch, a self- taught photo realist painter who grew up in Texas. The other is Renel Plouffe, an abstract painter originally from Gatineau City in Western Quebec.

The Chattanooga Folk School has a new Executive Director. Like the other directors before her, Laura Walker is a musician, but unlike her predecessors she has had experience in organizing and running a business. It’s those skills, along with her natural affinity for people, that she hopes will enable her to revive the flagging fortunes of the Chattanooga Folk School. She spoke to WUTC's Richard Winham.

Peter Pan opens at The Signal Mountain Playhouse July 10. Originally written as a play, it was re-written in the mid-1950’s as a musical starring Mary Martin. Since then there have been several popular adaptations of the story, but for their production the director Jennifer Arbogast and her cast are going back to the Mary Martin version. Richard Winham talked to Dr. Arbogast, who also teaches musical theater at Chattanooga State, as well as two of the lead actors, Kimberlin Lacy and Daniel Meeks.