Richard Winham

Afternoon Music Host, Around & About Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

In Chattanooga and the surrounding counties, one in four children, and one in six adults, are hungry. They rely on the Chattanooga Area Food Bank to provide at least some of the food they eat every day. The Food Bank was established in 1972, and while they are making a difference, the need for their services in the 20 counties they serve remains acute. Richard Winham talked to Scott Bruce and Jordan Lyle. They have both been working with the Food Bank for about a year. For both of them, it has been an eye opening experience.

Nathan Kilpatrick creates custom frames for customers’ paintings at Reflections Gallery on Lee Highway. He’s also a painter and sculptor. He likes to work with found objects—pieces of wood that have washed up on the shore or that he finds discarded in trash piles.

He has an exhibition of his work opening at Reflections Gallery this Friday, September 15th. Richard Winham stopped by the gallery to look at some of his work and to talk to him about his unusual approach to framing and sculpture. 

On September 9th and 10th, Chattanooga will host the 2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship. The organizers of the Ironman contests expected more than 185,000 athletes to race in over 100 Ironman 70.3 races around the world this year. From those races more than 4000 athletes will be coming to Chattanooga to compete in the 2017 Ironman 70.3 World Championship. 

From the City of Chattanooga's Web site:

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof was reportedly Tennessee Williams’s favorite of all his plays. The Ensemble Theatre of Chattanooga’s production of the play opens this Friday evening at 7:30. Richard Winham talked to the director, Garry Posey, who told him it’s a play about mendacity.

The new school year is underway in Hamilton County. A new school superintendent, Dr, Bryan Johnson, the fourth person to hold the office since the city and county schools merged in 1997, has also begun working to help heal a school system many people feel is broken. In an editorial in the Chattanooga Times Free Press of August 11th, 2017, Pam Sohn wrote:

The River Gallery in Chattanooga's Bluff View art district is celebrating its 25th anniversary with a month-long show featuring three of the artists featured in the gallery’s first exhibition in 1992.

Richard Winham talked to Mary Portera, who together with her husband, Dr. Charles Portera, has developed the artisanal complex on the bluff above the Tennessee River in downtown Chattanooga.

Online grocery service Instacart is now available in Chattanooga. Richard Winham talked to Jennifer O’Shaughnessy, the area manager responsible for setting up the service in Chattanooga.

Three years ago, Jennifer Holder and Shawanda Mason Moore had $100 and a dream of bringing people together across the city. They started The Chattery, a nonprofit that offers classes in practically any subject someone is willing to teach. (Recently, Sean Phipps gave a short course on how to smoke a pipe properly.

This summer the Signal Mountain Playhouse is mounting a production of Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory. Many community theater groups may have found just building the sets for this show to be more than they wanted to handle, but the Signal Mountain Playhouse has a group of set designers who relish a challenge. Last summer they built a flying car for Chitty Chitty Bang Bang. This year they’ve built Willy Wonka’s chocolate factory.

For the past decade green|spaces, a non-profit company formed in 2007, has been trying to change the way Chattanoogans think about energy and energy consumption. Richard Winham talked to Dawn Hjelseth about the evolution of the company from its original role as a cheerleader to its current role as a developer of energy efficient housing in Chattanooga.

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

When noted playwright Arthur Miller wrote “All My Sons,” he has been quoted as saying it was his “final attempt at writing a commercially successful play.” Had the play not been a success he reportedly said he would “find some other line of work.”

The two artists behind Squonk Opera—Steve O’Hearn, who is part visual artist/part construction engineer, and his partner, composer Jackie Dempsey—aim to create work that is “fast, funny, shameless and inclusive.” Richard Winham talked to Steve O’Hearn on the telephone from Pittsburgh, where he and his partner live and work. Also in the studio were Bob Boyer, the director of the Patten Performance Series here at UTC, and Lisa Darger from UTC’s Office of Sustainability.

 

 Bra-Vo! Is billed as “fashion show celebrating life after cancer.” It is a celebration, but it’s also an essential fundraiser for Breast Cancer Support Services (BCSS) here in Chattanooga. BCSS offers spiritual, emotional and financial support for men, women and their families living under the shadow of breast cancer.

Since launching in 2014, the annual Chattanooga Film Festival has become a major event, featuring dozens and dozens of feature films and shorts, as well as secret screenings, discussion panels, and parties. Last year's event drew a crowd of more than 10,500 people.

This year's festival kicks off April 6th and lasts through the 9th. The full schedule is now online.

Festival founder Chris Dortch and his father (also named Chris Dortch) join us to preview this year's event.

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