Richard Winham

Afternoon Music Host, Around & About Producer

Host and producer of the Afternoon Music program, Richard was born in London. He has lived in the United States since the early 1970s.  He moved to the US to find a job in radio. He has worked in both commercial and public radio ever since. Richard has been with WUTC since 1987; his show offers a freewheeling mix of music and interviews with musicians and other movers and shakers within our community, as well as visiting musicians and artists from across the country.

Ways to Connect

The Muse of Fire Project is an opportunity for children from Chattanooga aged between 10 and 13 to write a play for adult actors. The children, mentored by working actors, meet every Monday after school for ten weeks in the Chattanooga Downtown Public Library where they slowly develop their plays. Richard Winham talked to three of the young playwrights as well as three of the actors and mentors who work with them in the project.

When noted playwright Arthur Miller wrote “All My Sons,” he has been quoted as saying it was his “final attempt at writing a commercially successful play.” Had the play not been a success he reportedly said he would “find some other line of work.”

The two artists behind Squonk Opera—Steve O’Hearn, who is part visual artist/part construction engineer, and his partner, composer Jackie Dempsey—aim to create work that is “fast, funny, shameless and inclusive.” Richard Winham talked to Steve O’Hearn on the telephone from Pittsburgh, where he and his partner live and work. Also in the studio were Bob Boyer, the director of the Patten Performance Series here at UTC, and Lisa Darger from UTC’s Office of Sustainability.

 

 Bra-Vo! Is billed as “fashion show celebrating life after cancer.” It is a celebration, but it’s also an essential fundraiser for Breast Cancer Support Services (BCSS) here in Chattanooga. BCSS offers spiritual, emotional and financial support for men, women and their families living under the shadow of breast cancer.

Since launching in 2014, the annual Chattanooga Film Festival has become a major event, featuring dozens and dozens of feature films and shorts, as well as secret screenings, discussion panels, and parties. Last year's event drew a crowd of more than 10,500 people.

This year's festival kicks off April 6th and lasts through the 9th. The full schedule is now online.

Festival founder Chris Dortch and his father (also named Chris Dortch) join us to preview this year's event.

Michael Gray has been hosting and producing the River City Sessions for several years now. The show is recorded live at Gran Falloon on Main Street and then airs on WUTC on the fourth Sunday of every month at 8 in the evening. River City Sessions is a showcase for storytellers, but as Michael Gray told Richard Winham, that wasn’t clear to him when he first began producing the show.

The next live taping is Thursday, March 9 at 7 pm.

Every year for the past seven years the University of Tennessee at Chattanooga Music department has staged a weekend-long Piano Extravaganza. The Extravaganza, a showcase for UTC students and faculty as well as special guests, was conceived and organized by Dr. Sin Sing Tsai. Dr. Tsai passed away recently, but the music department decided to continue with the Piano Extravaganza as a tribute to Dr. Tsai. 

Every year, the Chattanooga Music Club offers scholarships to high school seniors interested in going on to college to study music. This year the club is offering eight different scholarships. To find out more, Richard Winham talked to one of the past scholarship winners and to Janet Sump, the chair for the auditions.

Anna Saffley Houston led a rich life. She was an independent woman in an era when very few women had that option. But she's best remembered for the huge collection of antiques she amassed in her lifetime--now housed  in The Houston Museum in the Bluff View Arts District. Richard Winham talked to Lilly Waters, the outreach coordinator for the museum, about the collection and the life of the singular woman behind it. The museum's annual antiques show/sale runs 2/24 through 2/26.

The Chattanooga Chorus is a group of men who love to sing acapella barbershop harmony. Every year on Valentines Day, The Choo Choo Chorus dispatches quartets all over the city to serenade sweethearts. As you might imagine the singers have stories to tell—they shared a few with Richard Winham.

Greater Tuna, the second smallest town in Texas, is the setting for the play opening at the Signal Mountain Playhouse on Friday February 11th. The play features twenty different characters , but only two actors. Richard Winham talked to the actors, Mark Oglesby and Dennis Parker, along with the play’s director, Michelle Ford.

Joel and Melanie Krautstrunk moved to Chattanooga three years ago planning to open a micro-brewery and a taproom. By the end of this year they hope to be running Chattanooga’s largest independent brewery.  Richard Winham talked to Joel Krautstrunk about his passion for beer and how he and his wife have managed to go from a micro-brewery to a macro brewery in such a short time.  

Riverworks Marketing Group wants to design a website—or upgrade an existing site—for a local non-profit—for nothing. Gratis. Free. So they decided to run an on-line competition. Richard Winham talked to the owners, Jackie and Steve Errico, about web marketing and why they decided to donate as much as $10,000 worth of design work to a local non-profit. The deadline to nominate non-profits is January 31.

Noted local drummer Josh Green has set himself a goal. Every day this year, the drummer, who has played with a number of local bands including Infradig, The Distribution and Summer Dregs, is going to upload a collection of drum and percussion tracks to his website. He records these original beats so other musicians can download them for use in other compositions. He began the project on his birthday last November.

Julie Babb

As part of progressive rock band Glass Hammer, Steve Babb and Fred Schendel are stars…in Japan and in Europe…and yet here in Chattanooga, their hometown, they are relative unknowns—and they like it that way. Richard Winham visited the two musicians in their recording studio recently to talk about their new album, their upcoming tour, and the work they do as producers for other musicians in Chattanooga.

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