All Things Considered

Weekdays at 4pm
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, and Melissa Block

This program presents a trademark mix of news, interviews, commentaries, reviews, and offbeat features. It rings with the disparate voices of its commentators, from veteran analyst Daniel Schorr and storyteller Kevin Kling to poet Andrei Codrescu. It hums with the distinctive music that threads between reports -- music collected in the online program All Songs Considered. And by the time All Things Considered marked its 30th anniversary on the air, the program had earned many of journalism's highest honors, including the Peabody, DuPont and Overseas Press Club awards.

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2:45pm

Mon December 10, 2012
Sports

Russia's Hockey Glad To Have NHL-Lockout Orphans

Originally published on Tue December 11, 2012 3:43 am

Erik Christensen, right, from Lev Praha challenges Alexander Ovechkin from Dynamo Moscow during their KHL ice hockey match in Prague, Czech Republic, Tuesday, Oct. 9. Ovechkin is among those NHL players who were signed by European clubs because of the NHL lockout.
Petr David Josek AP

As the National Hockey League lockout drags into its 86th day, which featured news that more games have been cancelled including the All-Star game, some of the league's biggest stars are getting plenty of action back in their home countries.

In Russia, major NHL players such as Alex Ovechkin and Evgeni Malkin are giving a boost to the fledgling KHL—the Kontinental Hockey League.

Russian NHL players are scattered throughout the KHL teams that still carry names from the Soviet era when Russia dominated world hockey.

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2:20pm

Mon December 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Navy SEAL Killed During Afghan Rescue Is Identified

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:44 pm

The member of Navy SEAL Team 6 killed during this weekend's rescue in Afghanistan of an American doctor was Petty Officer 1st Class Nicholas Checque, 28, of Monroeville, Pa.

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12:26pm

Mon December 10, 2012
The Two-Way

Many Apps For Children Still Raise Privacy Concerns, FTC Says

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:44 pm

Who's collecting information about her?
Peggy Turbett The Plain Dealer /Landov

Developers of smartphone and tablet apps aimed at children have done little in the past year to give parents "the information they need to determine what data is being collected from their children, how it is being shared, or who will have access to it," the Federal Trade Commission reports.

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11:47am

Mon December 10, 2012
Europe

Spain's Crisis Leads To Rise Of Grass-Roots Groups

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 8:44 pm

A demonstrator shouts during a protest against housing evictions in Madrid last month. The sign to his right reads, "Stop evictions."
Pablo Blazquez Dominguez Getty Images

A year and a half ago, recession-ravaged Spanish society reacted to the economic crisis with the "Indignados," a mass protest that inspired the worldwide "Occupy" movement.

The "angry ones" are long gone from Spanish streets, but they've evolved into many grass-roots associations now filling the gaps left by the eroding welfare state, spawning a new form of anti-austerity resistance that embraces all branches of society, from those who have lost homes to foreclosures, to the entire judiciary.

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7:09pm

Sun December 9, 2012
The Two-Way

This Is The World's Most Expensive Whisky

Originally published on Wed December 19, 2012 7:48 pm

Glenfiddich's Janet Sheed Roberts Reserve. The last bottle goes up for auction on Tuesday.
Courtesy Glenfiddich

Update at 10 a.m. ET, Dec. 11. We Were Wrong:

Though Glenfiddich Malt Master Brian Kinsman told Weekend All Things Considered that he thought the $94,000 paid for a bottle of his company's Janet Sheed Roberts Reserve 55 Year Old whisky was a record, it appears he was mistaken.

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6:08pm

Sun December 9, 2012
Race

The End Of Affirmative Action? What Could Be Next

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 7:09 pm

Abigail Fisher, the Texan involved in the University of Texas affirmative action case, accompanied by her attorney Bert Rein, right, talks to reporters outside the Supreme Court in October.
Susan Walsh AP

The Supreme Court ruled in 2003 that universities can consider race as a factor, if the goal is to achieve diversity. But in that case, former Justice Sandra Day O'Connor famously wrote that within 25 years, race-based affirmative action would become obsolete.

But affirmative action could disappear sooner than that.

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5:06pm

Sun December 9, 2012
Around the Nation

Ill. Considers Licenses For Undocumented Immigrants

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 7:09 pm

Former Illinois Gov. Jim Edgar speaks to reporters at the Illinois State Capitol on Dec. 4, before a Senate vote on a law that would allow undocumented immigrants to obtain driver's licenses.
Seth Perlman AP

Illinois could become the third state — after Washington and New Mexico — where undocumented immigrants can obtain driver's licenses. The legislation is halfway there. A bill that passed the state Senate 41-14 last Tuesday has bipartisan support.

Before the Senate vote, leaders from both parties, including Democratic Gov. Pat Quinn and Republican former Gov. Jim Edgar, spoke out in favor of the legislation. Supporters say that the roads will be safer if undocumented immigrants can pass the tests and get driver's licenses.

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4:29pm

Sun December 9, 2012
U.S.

Baltimore Says, 'Immigrants Welcome'

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 7:09 pm

Hundreds gather in Baltimore's harbor Sept. 22 to witness the naturalization of nearly 50 new Americans.
Acacia Squires NPR

Hundreds of people gathered in September at Baltimore's harbor as the wind gusted off the water's edge. Nearly 50 of them were about to be sworn in as U.S. citizens. Some were young, some old. There were uniformed members of the U.S. military, parents and children. There were immigrants from El Salvador, China, Honduras and countries in between. They raised their right hands, recited the naturalization oath to the United States, and were declared fully American.

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3:04pm

Sun December 9, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

A Bald Mezzo And Three Shades Of Violin: Classical Favorites From 2012

Originally published on Sun December 9, 2012 7:09 pm

On Silfra, violinist Hilary Hahn improvises with prepared pianist Hauschka.
DG

From mezzo-soprano Cecilia Bartoli's ambitious revival of the early Baroque composer Agostino Stefani (and yes, she's got another outrageous album cover) to three very different roles for the violin, here's a clutch of classical albums I returned to again and again this year for sheer delight and aural inspiration. Bartoli lavishes extravagant attention on the music of a fascinating but forgotten link in the history of opera.

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6:03pm

Sat December 8, 2012
Business

Not Just Patriotic, U.S. Manufacturing May Be Smart

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 8:12 pm

General Electric's Appliance Park has been in Louisville, Ky., since 1951. But it's putting new power behind its U.S. production.
General Electric Co.
  • As Heard On Weekends On 'All Things Considered'

The advantages to making products in the U.S. are starting to stack up — and companies are taking notice. Among them are Apple, which announced Thursday it plans to start producing some of its Mac computers here instead of in China, and General Electric, which is making big investments at home.

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5:04pm

Sat December 8, 2012
Middle East

Egypt Remains Electrified In Protests

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 6:51 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

In a startling move, Egyptian President Mohammed Morsi appears to have reversed a controversial presidential decree that granted him extraordinary powers and launched weeks of protest. NPR's Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson is in Cairo. She's covering that story and joins us now. And, Soraya, tell us what's going on.

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5:04pm

Sat December 8, 2012
Business

Hoodie Company Put U.S. Manufacturing In Style

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 6:51 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

We're talking about the small but significant trend called insourcing, manufacturing things here in the U.S. Earlier this year, Bayard Winthrop opened up a sweatshirt and hoodie business in San Francisco, and he called it American Giant. He's got 10 people in the front office and up to 150 workers in a factory where his entire line, soup to nuts, is made in America.

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3:36pm

Sat December 8, 2012
The Two-Way

Why This Video Makes This Editor Think Clinton Will Run In 2016

Originally published on Mon December 10, 2012 6:45 am

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton watches a video about her public life that was played before she addressed the Saban Forum in Washington last week.
Mary Calvert Reuters /Landov

There's an event held every year in Washington known as the Saban Forum — named for Haim Saban, the Israeli-American media mogul who funds it. It's a night of elbow-rubbing between D.C. and Middle East political leadership, though foreign dignitaries are mostly Israeli.

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2:49pm

Sat December 8, 2012
Superstorm Sandy: Before, During And Beyond

Next Post-Sandy Challenge: The Sea Of Damaged Cars

Originally published on Sat December 8, 2012 9:40 pm

Abandoned and flooded cars sit in the Rockaway neighborhood of Queens, N.Y., on Nov. 2. It's estimated that it could cost auto insurers $800 million to deal with all the claims from the storm.
Spencer Platt Getty Images

Hurricane Sandy wrecked hundreds of thousands of cars all along the New York and New Jersey shorelines, and could cost auto insurers around $800 million. That's not their only problem; disposing of these water-damaged vehicles is not so simple.

If you have comprehensive coverage on a damaged car, the insurance company gives you a check and the car disappears from your life. But then what?

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5:53pm

Fri December 7, 2012
Law

Supreme Court Takes Up Same-Sex-Marriage Cases

Originally published on Fri December 7, 2012 11:50 pm

Edith Windsor, 83, is asking the Supreme Court to strike down the federal Defense of Marriage Act. When Windsor's female spouse died, the federal government, acting under DOMA, required Windsor to pay estate taxes that she would not have owed if her spouse had been a man.
Richard Drew AP

The U.S. Supreme Court announced Friday that for the first time it will tackle the issue of same-sex marriage. Defying most expectations, the justices said they will examine two cases, presenting the possibility that the court could decide all the basic issues surrounding same-sex marriage in one fell swoop.

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